Do you see any way in which Kouhestani’s statement can be true while still given this relationship between the novel’s title and Christianity?

Read Maryam Khouhestani’s article, “Environmental and Social Crises: New Perspective on Social and Environmental Injustice in Octavia E. Butler’s Parable of the Sower” (2015).There, Kouhestani writes that “Butler initiates Earthseed as a religion against Christianity to show that religion is not passive by nature and that it can be dynamic and constructive” (899).However, the title of Butler’s novel alludes to Christian scripture (the “New Testament”). Do you see any way in which Kouhestani’s statement can be true while still given this relationship between the novel’s title and Christianity? How does Biblical scripture feature otherwise in Butler’s novel such that it either supports or tells against Khouhestani’s statement? How does the novel’s title (and its meaning), and the other engagements with Christian and Jewish scripture in Butler’s novel, also perhaps complicate, or compliment, Khouhestani’s conclusion that “Lauren (or Butler) believes that the time is ripe for a great change. Although Earthseed is defective, it has the potential to change the world. The most important revision is human destiny” (902)?